No Longer Accepting Cases

Gardasil is very effective at preventing sexually transmitted infection from HPV, which can cause genital warts and cancer. However, the vaccine itself may have serious side effects in rare cases.

HPV Vaccine Overview

The best way to prevent sexually transmitted infection from the Human papillomavirus (HPV) is with the HPV vaccine. There at at least 70 varieties of HPV, and dozens of high-risk varieties can cause genital warts or cancer of the anus, cervix, vagina, or vulva. Experts now recommend that most young adults should be immunized against HPV before they become sexually active.

There are two types of HPV vaccine:

  • Gardasil: This vaccine can prevent most cases of genital warts and cancers of the cervix, anus, vulva, and vagina. It can be given to both males and females.
  • Cervarix: This vaccine can prevent most cervical cancers and pre-cancers caused by the HPV virus. It is only available for females.

HPV Vaccine Side Effects

This risk of having a serious HPV vaccine side effect is far lower than the risk of being infected with HPV — approximately 50% of sexually active males and females get HPV at some point in their lives, and they are at risk for genital warts and cancer. Health experts have determined that the benefits of the HPV vaccine far outweigh the risk of side effects. Even so, experts know that serious side effects do occur sometimes. A serious allergic reaction, high fever, fainting spell, or other side effect could cause serious injury. Because the HPV vaccine is relatively new, experts are still gathering information to determine whether some serious but rare side effects are actually caused by the vaccine.

Side effects of Gardasil:

  • Allergic reaction, which could be life-threatening (anaphylaxis, anaphylactic shock)
  • Pain, redness, and swelling at the injection site
  • Headache
  • Fainting, which could cause a fall-related injury
  • Jerking or staring movements
  • High fever (above 102 degrees F)
  • Guillain-Barr√© syndrome (GBS)
  • Blood clots
  • Death
  • And more

Side effects of Cervarix:

  • Allergic reaction, which could be life-threatening (anaphylaxis, anaphylactic shock)
  • Pain, redness, or swelling at the site of the injection
  • High fever
  • Headache
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Fainting spells
  • Jerking, staring movements
  • Muscle weakness
  • And more

HPV Vaccine Injury Claim

Do you have an HPV vaccine injury claim for injuries caused by Gardasil or Cervarix? Your claim could be worth up to $250,000 from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP), a federal fund established to help victims of vaccine injuries, and prevent lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers.

You must meet the following requirements:

  • The HPV vaccine must have caused a serious injury — it must have caused disability, or death, or required hospitalization, or needed surgery, or lasted for at least six months.
  • The HPV vaccine must have caused serious injury to you, your child, or your family member. The legal guardians of injured people may also be eligible.
  • You have a limited amount of time to file your claim — 3 years for an injury, 2 years for a death, and 4 years for an injury that eventually caused death.

Once you file your HPV vaccine injury claim, your case will go to the federal Vaccine Court in Washington D.C. There, experts will review the evidence in your case and determine whether there is a high probability that the vaccine is responsible for your injury. If they are convinced, they may award compensation for your pain, suffering, past and future medical expenses, legal fees, and more.

The VICP has received a total of 180 HPV vaccine lawsuits. Of these, 171 were for injury and 9 were for death. The VICP awarded compensation in 28 cases and decided to dismiss 38 cases. The rest of the cases are still being reviewed.