Texas Erythema Multiforme Lawyer

Texas Injury Lawyer for Erythema Multiforme Side EffectsErythema multiforme is a skin reaction that has been linked to medications like Avelox, Cipro, Lamictal, Dilantin, Motrin, and Zithromax.

Need a Texas Erythema Multiforme Lawyer? Collen A. Clark is a true advocate for his clients and is passionate about helping Texans that have been injured or wronged. If you or a loved one was diagnosed with a severe skin rash, you should contact our lawyers immediately. You may be entitled to compensation by filing a lawsuit.

What is Erythema Multiforme?

Erythema Multiforme (EM) is a skin reaction that is usually mild and goes away in a few weeks. Other symptoms can also occur. In severe cases, it can be life-threatening or deadly.

What Causes Erythema Multiforme?

Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) infection causes most cases of erythema multiforme. Some people get a mouth sore or a cold sore on their lips 3-14 days before the rash. It can also be caused by medications.

What Medications Can Cause Erythema Multiforme?

Major cases of erythema multiforme are usually caused by medications like antibiotics, NSAID painkillers (ibuprofen), and anti-seizure medications. Some of these medications include:

Erythema Multiforme vs. SJS and TEN

Erythema multiforme closely resembles Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN), but they are distinct diseases. SJS and TEN are rarer than erythema multiforme, usually more serious, and mostly caused by medications rather than herpes.

Mild Case of Erythema Multiforme

Minor cases of erythema multiforme cause a small skin rash without involving the mucous membranes. The rash is slightly itchy or uncomfortable. It usually fades over 2-4 weeks without scarring or skin discoloration.

Major Case of Erythema Multiforme

Major cases of erythema multiforme cause a whole-body skin rash and inflammation of the mucous membranes. Lesions and blisters develop on the throat, lips, eyes, and genitals, accompanied by fever and extreme fatigue. Up to 10% of the skin may die and peel off.

Early Signs of Erythema Multiforme

The rash appears suddenly and spreads over a few days. It usually starts on the hands or feet before spreading to the arms, legs, upper body, and face. The rash looks like small red spots or a “bulls-eye.” The spots may become raised patches a few centimeters in size.

Other Symptoms of Erythema Multiforme

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Mouth sores that make it hard to eat and drink
  • Swollen lips covered in crusts
  • Genital sores
  • Urinary pain
  • Eye sores
  • Blurry vision and sensitivity to light
  • Muscle aches

Long Term Effects of Erythema Multiforme

Most people completely recover within 2-6 weeks and do not have long-term scarring. The risk of other long-term side effects increases for people who had infections or major rashes. There is a risk of permanent vision problems, organ damage, and skin disfigurement.

Life After Erythema Multiforme

Erythema multiforme can return, especially if it was caused by herpes. Patients may need to take anti-viral medications to prevent herpes outbreaks if they occur frequently. If it was caused by a medication, the patient will no longer be able to take that medication safely.

Need an Erythema Multiforme Lawyer in Texas?

Collen A. Clark is a true advocate for his clients and is passionate about helping Texans that have been injured or wronged.

Collen’s amazing success in the courtroom and well known dedication to his clients has earned him the recognition of his peers as one of The Top Trial Lawyers in Texas.”

The Clark Firm has assembled a team of trial lawyers with more than 100 years experience, participation in over 600 jury trials and $260 million in verdicts and/or settlements. Please use the form below to contact our Texas erythema eultiforme lawyers for a free lawsuit review.

Free Case Review

Verified 100% Secure Site

To contact us for a free review of your potential case, please fill out the form below or call us toll free 24 hrs/day by dialing: (866) 879-3040.

*
*
*